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Ordering of Sentences Test 9

Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.

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1. S1: The essence of democracy is the active participation of the people in government affair.
S6: By and large it is the actual practice of our way of life.

P: When the people are active watchmen and participants, we have that fertile soil in which democracy fluorishes.
Q: This democracy of ours is founded upon a faith in the overall judgement of the people as a whole.
R: When the people – do not participate, the spirit of democratic action dies.
S: When the people are honestly and clearly informed, their common sense can be relied upon to carry the nation safely through any crisis.

 
 
 
 

2. S1: Helen Keller has an ageless quality about her in keeping with her amazing life story.
S6: She believes the blind should live and work with their fellows, with full responsibility.

P: Although warmed by this human reaction, she has no wish to be set aside from the rest of mankind.
Q: She is an inspiration to both blind and the seeing everywhere.
R: When she visited Japan after World War II, boys and girls from remote villages ran to her, crying “Helen Keller”.
S: Blind, deaf and mute from early childhood, she rose above her triple handicap to become one of the best known characters in the modem world.

 
 
 
 

3. S1: I also demand adventure for myself
S6: The satisfaction of adventure is something much more solid than a thrill.

P: As a physiologist I can try experiments on myself
Q: Life without danger would be like life without mustard.
R: Love of adventure does not mean love of thrills.
S: I can also participate in wars and revolutions of which I approve.

 
 
 
 

4. S1: This year many States have been badly affected by the drought situation prevailing in the country.
S6: Either way, it seems the lot of the Indian farmer to be at the mercy of the elements.

P: No better is the situation elsewhere, where floods have ravaged the standing crop.
Q: Though some have been less affected, even these are facing an uphill task in managing the situation.
R: Especially pitiable is the plight of the poor farmer who cannot offord a tubewell to irrigate his land.
S: Here the predicament is more equitable, for everybody’s land is similarly submerged under ten feet of water.

 
 
 
 

5. S1: Over the centuries the face of the earth has become crowded with monuments and memorials.
S6: We must have more space for building new things and developing open countryside.

P: Films, pictures and even miniature models can be made of the relics for posterity interested in knowing about them.
Q: Some people however would contend that antiquity should be preserved for future generations.
R: If they were all to be preserved we will have very little space for other, more useful, things.
S: Personally, I do not agree with their contention.

 
 
 
 

6. S1: You live either in a village or a town of India.
S6: India is our motherland.

P: Many villages and towns form a tehsil or a taluka.
Q: There are also some areas in our country called Union Territories.
R: Many tehsils or talukas form a district and many districts form a State.
S: These, together with all the states of our country make India.

 
 
 
 

7. S1: Have you ever thought of the ways in which birds are useful to man?
S6: Finally, birds and their eggs form an important part of man’s food.

P: Again, there are some birds that help us to keep our surroundings clean by removing dead animals and decaying matter.
Q: A bird eats hundreds of insects every day, and thus helps to limit the insect population of the world.
R: Their service to man is to check the growth of insects.
S: Another service done by birds to man is to kill. animals like rats and squirrels which destroy the farmers’ crops.

 
 
 
 

8. S1: The December dance and music season in Madras is like the annual tropical cyclone.
S6: Many a hastily planted shrub gets washed away in the storm.

P: A few among the new aspirants dazzle with the colour of youth, like fresh saplings.
Q: It rains an abundance of music for over a fortnight.
R: Thick clouds of expectation charge the atmosphere with voluminous advertisements.
S: At the end of it one is left with the feeling thafthe music of only those artists seasoned by careful nurturing, stands tall like well rooted trees.

 
 
 
 

9. S1: In the eighteenth century people expected most of their children to die before they were grown up.
S6: There is no obvious limit to the improvement of health that cail be brought about by medicine.

P: Improvement began at the beginning of the nineteenth century, chiefly owing to vaccination.
Q: The general death rate in 1948 (10.8) was the lowest ever recorded upto that date.
R: In 1920 the infant mortality in England and Wales was 80 per thousand, in 1948 it was 34 per thousand.
S: It has continued ever since and is still continuing.

 
 
 
 

10. S1: But Mr. Ford was by no means the inventor of mass production.
S6: When one huge machine began to perform rapidly due operations previously done slowly by hand, the age of mass production was bom.

P: It is difficult, indeed, to say who was.
Q: Brilliant men perfected cotton gins and looms.
R: The inventibn of the steam-engine gave manufacturers the cheap power they needed.
S: When the first large mills for the manufacture of cloth were built, mass production began.

 
 
 
 

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