Ordering of Sentences Test 7

Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.

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1. S1: There were no finger prints anywhere.
S6: These conclusions made the detectives think that it was a fake theft.

P: First of all it was impossible even for a child to enter through the hole in the roof.
Q: When the investigators tried to reconstruct the crime, they came up against facts.
R: Moreover, when the detectives tried to push a silver vase, it was found to be. double the size of the hole.
S: Again, the size of the hole was examined by the experts who said that nothing had been passed through it.

 
 
 
 

2. S1: Evolution is not progress.
S6: For, like progress, evolution does, over the long run, imply betterment.

P: And yet, for all their differences, it is not wholly wrong to identify evolution with progress.
Q: As a noted scientist had said, “the tapeworm in its inglorious lot in man’s intestine is an outcome of evolution as well as the lark at heaven’s gate.”
R: Three hundred million years after the first land creatures crawled out of the sea, the one-called amoeba is man himself.
S: The physical facts of evolution betray such. advance.

 
 
 
 

3. S1: Life is hazardous.
S6: Everything points to a speciat kind of arms race with elaborate strategies and counter-strategies for attack and defence.

P: And prey have evolved adaptations that reduce the risk of being eaten.
Q: Many animals are killed and eaten by other animals.
R: And many predators die from starvation because they fail to secure prey.
S: Predators have continued to evolve adaptations that enable them to locate and kill prey.

 
 
 
 

4. S1: Science means finding out how things actually do happen.
S6: But Galileo proved his point experimentally by dropping weights from the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

P: He showed that a light object falls to the ground at the same rate as a heavy object.
Q: It does not mean laying down principles as to how they ought to happen.
R: This did not agree with the views of most learned men of that time.
S: The most famous example of this concerns Galileo’s discovery about falling bodies.

 
 
 
 

5. S1: Governments are instituted among men to secure their certain inalienable rights.
S6: Such was the necessity which constrained the united colonies of America to give up thier allegiance to the British Crown and declare themselves free and independent states.

P: Accordingly, men are more disposed to suffer than to right themselves by abolishing the forms of governments to which they are accustomed.
Q: But prudence will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes.
R: They derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, and therefore, can also be changed by them.
S: But whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these rights of the people, it is their duty to throw off such a government.

 
 
 
 

6. S1: There has been an alarming increase in the number of vehicles on Delhi roads.
S6: Should the pedestrians’ case be allowed to go by default?

P: The pedestrian has, however, been the worst sufferer.
Q: There is -no place where the pedestrian can move freely without the fear of traffic.
R: Zebra crossings like the pavements are no longer safe.
S: This has further aggravated the problem of pollution in the city.

 
 
 
 

7. S1: The fifty seven storey Wool-worth Tbwer is in New York.
S6: A new champion is the Empire State Building which rises 102 storeys into the sky.

P: Soon it became one of the famous buildings in the world.
Q: It was completed in 1912.
R: Americans took pride in this tall skyscraper.
S: However, it was not long before five other buildings topped the Woolworth Tower.

 
 
 
 

8. S1: We are living in an age in which technology has suddenly ‘annihilated distance’.
S6: In that event, we should be dooming ourselves to wipe each other out.

P: Are We going to let this consciousness of our variety make us fear and hate each other?
Q: Physically we are now all neighbours, but psychologically we are still strangers to each other.
R: How are we going to react?
S: We have never been so conscious of our variety as we are now that we have come to such close quarters.

 
 
 
 

9. S1: We talk about democracy, but when it comes to any particular thing, we prefer a man belonging to our caste and community.
S6: Favouritism and nepotism have been responsible for much discontent in our country.

P: We must be in a position to respect a man as a man.
Q: It means our democracy is a phoney kind of democracy.
R: We must extend opportunities of development to those who deserve them.
S: Our weakness for our own caste and community should not influence our decision.

 
 
 
 

10. S1: There was a time Egypt faced economic crisis.
S6: Egypt was able to sustain itself by its cotton produce.

P: Cotton is the chief export commodity 9f Egypt.
Q: Foreign trade depends on cultivation of cotton on large scale.
R: It became necessary for Egypt to boost cotton crops.
S: Only by means of increasing foreign trade Egypt could survive.

 
 
 
 

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